Smoker's polyps - very large

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Smoker's polyps after treatment with partial excision and KTP laser reduction. There is a suture in the left vocal cord that has

A female smoker has had trouble with a husky voice since she can remember and she is now in her mid-60s. Her huskiness has become worse over the past one-and-a-half years and at times her voice not only in varies in quality, but at times it fades out completely with use. Sometimes her voice suddenly chokes off and she can’t generate a sound. She finds it almost impossible to yell. Recently she has begun to notice increased difficulty breathing.

She has smoked two packs a day for 50 years though she is now trying to quit and has started a medication to help her quit. She has always been talkative and rates herself as a 7/7 on the talkativeness scale.

Listening to her voice, her pitch would be considered low even for a man. It is quite rough as well. She doesn’t mind her deep pitch. All her friends recognize her voice as being deep.

On her endoscopic examination she has large polyps extending the length of both vocal cords. They are based on the superior surface and they move in and out with speaking and breathing. At times they get caught below her vocal cords and no sound comes out at all. Because they are so large, at times she squeezes her false vocal cords close enough together and makes them vibrate.

The vibration of the false vocal cords contributes both to her deep pitch and the rough quality of her voice. The false vocal cords are very thick relative to the true vocal cords ordinarily so they always create a very low pitch if they are used as a sound source. Also since she is generating sound with the two false cords at one pitch and each of her true cords is a different size, so the true cords add in two additional pitches, she is making up to three pitches at one time and that accounts for her very rough voice.

The stiffness of the polyps and the false cords creates the effortfulness she senses. With this stiffness she tends to channel some of the air toward the posterior, non-vibratory portion of the vocal cords. This air leak creates the husky aspect of her voice.

A female smoker has had trouble with a husky voice since she can remember and she is now in her mid-60s. Her huskiness has become worse over the past one-and-a-half years and at times her voice not only in varies in quality, but at times it fades out completely with use. Sometimes her voice suddenly chokes off and she can’t generate a sound. She finds it almost impossible to yell. Recently she has begun to notice increased difficulty breathing.

She has smoked two packs a day for 50 years though she is now trying to quit and has started a medication to help her quit. She has always been talkative and rates herself as a 7/7 on the talkativeness scale.

Listening to her voice, her pitch would be considered low even for a man. It is quite rough as well. She doesn’t mind her deep pitch. All her friends recognize her voice as being deep.

On her endoscopic examination she has large polyps extending the length of both vocal cords. They are based on the superior surface and they move in and out with speaking and breathing. At times they get caught below her vocal cords and no sound comes out at all. Because they are so large, at times she squeezes her false vocal cords close enough together and makes them vibrate.

The vibration of the false vocal cords contributes both to her deep pitch and the rough quality of her voice. The false vocal cords are very thick relative to the true vocal cords ordinarily so they always create a very low pitch if they are used as a sound source. Also since she is generating sound with the two false cords at one pitch and each of her true cords is a different size, so the true cords add in two additional pitches, she is making up to three pitches at one time and that accounts for her very rough voice.

The stiffness of the polyps and the false cords creates the effortfulness she senses. With this stiffness she tends to channel some of the air toward the posterior, non-vibratory portion of the vocal cords. This air leak creates the husky aspect of her voice.